The Justice Coin

The Justice Coin

About as "collectible" as a ballpoint pen.

Of all the late night products, the Justice Coin probably raises more moral qualms than all the others put together. It's one thing to think about people wasting their money on the latest hair removal system or shoddy fix-it product. But it's quite another to be faced with a coin that literally celebrates death, and with a company that leverages 9/11 sentiment to line their own pockets.
Plus it's a terrible investment, to boot. 
 
In fact, the trade in commemorative coins is such a bad investment that it doesn't even warrant the name. These coins are not rare - in fact, they are printed in vast numbers, so that the companies which strike them can make the most money possible. They are overpriced for the base metals, because they are "collectibles." 

If you buy an uncirculated commemorative coin in a special container, you can be assured that you have paid too much for it. From a financial or collectible standpoint, you would literally be better off buying actual Beanie Babies. (Why not save up your money and invest in the stock market? You can buy gold futures, if you like.)

One side of the Justice Coin celebrates 9/11. It features the Twin Towers and the Pentagon (which seems to have been wedged up awkwardly against the edge of the coin). It also has a lot of words, in the form of two quotes, one by President George W. Bush and one by Obama. 
 
(In addition to being morally dubious, this coin is visually unattractive. Compare it to some of the other beautiful coin designs in the world… the Justice Coin seems to have been slapped together by someone with no design sense or artistic talent whatsoever.)
 
The other side features Seal Team Six, the American flag, two helicopters, and the jarring phrase "YOU CAN RUN BUT YOU CANNOT HIDE."
 
I suppose they didn't want a word as informal as "can't" on their coin. But "cannot" just doesn't work in a phrase as downright redneck as "you can run but you can't hide." The extra syllable also throws the scansion completely off. It's as verbally awkward as the coin's design is visually clunky.
 
Your purchase includes a "military briefing packet" which looks like a fold-out insert from a DVD. 
 
This coin contains about two dollars worth of gold, so don't be fooled into thinking you're buying a gold coin for twenty bucks. It's basically only gold in the sense that gold is a color.