My Secret Root Touch-Up Spray

My Secret Root Touch-Up Spray

Trust me, it's not gonna be a secret.

Every time I see the ad for My Secret Root Touch-Up Spray, I end up giggling helplessly. Now first of all, I agree that your roots can certainly be a problem. I have been coloring my hair for about 25 years now. I know whereof they speak.

But for pity's sake, the answer is not found in a giant spray can!
 
As far as I can tell, this product is basically the good old GLH Formula but marketed for women now. If you will recall, the product to mock in the 90s was GLH Formula, a Ronco product for men that made their thinning hair look thicker. It was basically mascara in a pressurized aerosol can format. You sprayed it on your hair and it would turn all your gray hairs dark, as well as thickening the appearance of all your hair. 
 
And it looked truly terrible.

Nevertheless, I have to applaud the quick thinking of whoever realized that you could market this stuff to women as a touch up method for their roots. I am convinced this is the same stuff, but who knows - maybe it's just a "remarkably similar" product.
 
The thing about this ad, regardless of the product, is that all of the women are holding these giant cans incredibly far away from their heads. If you really held the can out at arm's length, I'm pretty sure your entire living room would end up auburn with overspray. Not to mention your face and hands! 
 
They go to it with such enthusiasm, though. You can hardly fault them. They look pretty stoked about the whole thing. But here's a tip, from me to you: maybe you should do that stuff in the yard, you know? Not in the driveway. You probably can't get that stuff off the cement. And make it the back yard, so the petunias don't end up as brunettes.
 
The can costs $10, and the ads say you get 50 applications. However, each application will wash off in the next day's shower. If you look at the per-day price, I'm thinking it really doesn't' save you that much money versus doing it yourself, or going to a place like Supercuts or Hairmasters. This product rides an uneasy segment of the Venn diagram between "frugal" and "vain."
 
And not to belabor the point, but if you go to Hairmasters, you won't have to lay down a drop cloth over your furniture before you start coloring your hair.